Podcast Ep 36. “Yes, and…”: A Guide to Effective Science Communication Using Improvisation

Sustainable Nano Podcast cover image

Science communication takes a lot of different forms, including improvisation. In this episode, we interview Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology graduate student Paige Kinsley and alum Liz Laudadio. The episode dives deep into the life skills you can learn from doing improv, how it can make you a better listener, and how it relates to science …

Podcast Ep 35. Photographing the Unphotographable

How do you photograph the unphotographable? In this podcast episode we interview MIT research scientist Felice Frankel, who specializes in visualizing science, using pictures to draw audiences in and help scientists more deeply examine their own work, including nanoscale materials that are smaller than wavelengths of light! We also have a mini-interview with graduate student …

Entertaining and Informing: The Art of Fun Science Abbreviations

Have you ever had to read a paragraph or a sentence several times to understand it? I know I have. I often take 3-4 passes to understand particularly complex sentences, and it goes like this: the first pass, I just power through to see if I can get the overall gist of it. The second …

2017: Sustainable Nano Year in Review

Happy 2018! It’s hard to believe, but our very first Sustainable Nano blog post, Why are Nanomaterials So Special and What is the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology?, was published five years ago, on January 29, 2013! We’ve come a long way – 262 published posts, including 22 episodes of the podcast since its launch in …

De-Jargonification of Scientific Explications (AKA How to Say Stuff More Simply)

sign

Scientific writing is notoriously full of jargon. Jargon includes technical terms that are specific to a certain discipline, or sometimes it can be everyday words that mean something different in science than they do in normal life. Jargon has its place -- it can help scientists be very precise when communicating with each other. But …

Podcast Ep 13. Communicating About Science with ‘Lab Girl’ Author Hope Jahren

petri dishes, book with plant

Dr. Hope Jahren is a geobiologist who studies fossil organisms and the global environment, and is also the New York Times-bestelling author of the memoir Lab Girl. In this episode of the podcast, we interview Dr. Jahren about communicating science with the public, the joys and challenges of writing academic articles, and her thoughts on …

How to Understand Nobel Science? Food!

pretzel & bagel

Every year the Nobel Prizes bring some extra attention to science in the award categories of medicine, physics, and chemistry. This is a great opportunity for the general public to hear about science, but it can pose some communication challenges. How do you explain, for example, "theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases …

Let’s Talk About Responsible Science Communication…

TED talk

I am a TED enthusiast. TED is an organization that describes itself as a “nonpartisan nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks.” Chances are you’ve seen a TED talk at some point – maybe Meg Jay's advice for 20-somethings or Bryan Stevenson’s talk about the issues in our criminal justice system? They …

Recommended Reading: Spring Break Edition

It's Recommended Reading Day here at Sustainable Nano!  There's so much great stuff out there on the internet that it's impossible to catch it all, so we thought we'd offer you a little sampling of 10 cool things we shared on Twitter and Facebook over the last couple weeks. Undark: Deborah Blum (director of the Knight Science Journalism Program at MIT and most recently …