Please Take Our Science Communication Survey!

three people in lab coats and safety goggles look down on a glowing tablet

Hey Science Readers and Writers! We’ve launched a new survey about how readers respond to different text styles. We would appreciate any and all participation to help us understand what kind of texts are most engaging and effective for readers. Please CLICK HERE to take the survey! This will be us looking at your survey …

Applying to Graduate School: Advice for LGBTQ+ students from the community

Transcript & summary by Emma Bublitz Graduate school applications can be difficult to navigate under the best of circumstances. Each department, program, and institution often requires a different set of materials and has different, often unspoken, expectations for how students should navigate the system.1 However, for LGBTQ+ students there are additional challenges in the process. …

Pokémon Carbon Chemistry: Carbink and Diancie

For our Halloween blog post back in 2017, I used chemistry to figure out how many moles of gas are in a Gastly, a gaseous ghost/poison-type Pokémon. (Because Pokémon are fantastical creatures, it’s no surprise than many are either inspired by chemistry or can be understood through the lens of chemistry.) Today, as the world’s foremost writer on …

Valentine’s Day Science: What do M&Ms have to do with nanotechnology?

Do you have a favorite color of M&M, or a favorite type of M&M? Personally, I’m partial to orange M&Ms and mini M&Ms. You might think that orange M&Ms taste the same as all the other colors, and minis taste the same as regular-size, but you’d only be half right! Although you might expect both …

How many moles of gas are in a Pokémon Gastly?

Gastly

This year, Pokémon Go is celebrating the Halloween season with extra spooky Pokémon! As an avid fan of Pokémon as well as a chemist, I wondered, “Is there a connection between ghost Pokémon and chemistry?” With a little inspiration from last week's Mole Day, I was able to find one. (Mole Day is October 23 …

Royal Rife’s Universal Microscope (and Why It Can’t Exist)

Royal Rife

In the 1930s, microscope designer Royal Rife made a splash with reports that he had designed a new microscope that could view nanoscale objects such as viruses!1 The only problem was that it didn’t work. In fact, it couldn’t work, based on the basic physics of light. Rife was attempting to improve upon the optical …